Oldarticwear Miniature Modelling

Frankenstein Electronics Corpse, "Bringing electricity to Life"

 The Layouts that appear on this page have all been exhibited and are available for Model Railway Exhibitions.
 

For further details of any of the following layouts or to inquire about booking one for an Exhibition, please use the web form provided on the 'Contact Me' page.



MALDON MARKET HILL

 

Details of the Dengie Peninsula and South East Essex Light Railway station at Maldon (Market Hill)

 

Maldon Market Hill station is a small EM Gauge (18.2mm Track Gauge) layout.

The layout is approximately 1.70 metres long X 0.30 metres wide, although it would be best to allow a footprint of 2mts X 1.3 mts for safety and ease of movement for the operators. The viewing area is presented in the form of a small working diorama and this is 1.20 metres, the viewer has to look around the edges to see the whole area. It will need two operators to work the layout and only one car is required to transport the layout.

The layout is self supporting and stands on its own trestles and has it own lights, a stock table can be supplied. An electric socket will be required to power the layout and lights. A black fire retardant cloth is used to cover the exposed area between the bottom of the layout and the floor. 



1950s Market Hill, Maldon

Due to the prosperity after rationing was eased during the mid-1950s Market Hill station has been rebuilt with a new trackplan that has allowed longer trains and more trains to make use of the station and is now known as Market Hill, Maldon. The pilot loco now has its own siding and does not have to stay in the open air when its not working as it can shelter under the 'rebuilt' overbridge............. So is the premise of building a new layout with a revised trackplan that is roughly the same size as the original. This new build is 2mts long and now 00 finescale track (code 75) and is contolled by DCC........... just in case we run the occasional sound equipped Loco....................... See more pictures in the Photo Gallery (opens in a new page)

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Station Approach looking from the Factory Siding.

Same view on the 1950s version...

Deyton Heights

 

 Layout Dimensions: 1.30 metres X .50 metres. (Approx: 51inches X 20 inches)

 

 "As the cold, dark dank chill goes right through to your bones, the windy City is certainly living up to her name..............."

 

Deyton Heights is presented in a box system of construction. This enables the lighting to be viewed to it’s full effect which is a setting of the late afternoon to Sunset.

 

This is an HO dark, gloomy and atmospheric American themed switching yard of all that’s left from the old Interurban Tramways that have long since been abandoned.  The whole area is overdue for redevelopment. The main feature of this is the 'Works' building in the foreground. All manner of goods and articles are shipped into and out of this building in boxcars and other trucks by the railroad. In the Background there is a Commissary Building that's used for the unloading and restocking of Dining Cars and Baggage Cars for the big overland express passenger routes. The tight confines of the yard are at a low level to the overhead main lines that criss-cross the yard. The time period is from the mid 1940’s to early 1950’s. The whole area of the layout is a rundown industrial side of town near to a large station.


‘A study in Urban Decay’ with many small cameo scenes to delight the ‘viewers’.

 Photo Gallery page for more photos.





East Dunnet on the Thurne Valley Railway



The Thurne Valley Railway grew out of the need of the local population of Thurne with the surrounding villages and neighbouring hamlets to open up this area of East Norfolk and the Broads to the growing population and to also get more of the local produce to the larger market towns for the producers.

It was decided that a railway would be one of the means to serve this need, however the main railway companies around this time (late 19th century) had built their railways from London to Norwich and on to Cromer via Wroxham and also Great Yarmouth to Norwich via Acle and Brundall. The Small Hamlet of Thurne felt that they were missing out on these enterprises and so formed the Thurne Valley Railway Company.

And so begins the origins (excuse) to build a model railway.............................

This O-16.5 layout (originally called Rosie Cider Farm) was a small working diorama of a small farm that produces cider the owner uses trains to move the cider and other goods around and it was all contained within a 30inch X 20inch baseboard. At this size it won the Chelmsford and District Narrow Gauge competition in 2004.

 

The first 'rebuild' in 2010 was really to add an extension to make the operation more interesting. This new 'extension' saw the small hamlet and station of 'East Dunnet' appear and this increased the size to 60 X 30inches.

I have now made a complete rebuild of the whole layout to 72 X 36inches and have manged to use all of the original buildings. The Rosie Cider Farm main building has now had its working clock added, at last. The side buildings to this main building are new as the old ones did not have the clearance that has now been adopted throughout the complete new build.

There is now a 'Wood Yard' with a couple of sidings at the opposite end to the small village of 'East Dunnet'. This new build also allows trains to run around in a complete circuit now.

 The original Rosie Cider Farm was inspired by a visit to The Musée du Cidre, Vannes (Brittany, France), the layout is built to O scale (roughly 7mm to the foot) and uses 16.5mm gauge track.

The Name Rosie Cider Farm reminds me of the book 'Cider with Rosie' by Laurie Lee. The novel is an account of Lee's childhood in a village, in the period soon after the First World War. It chronicles the traditional village life which rapidly disappeared with the advent of new developments, such as the coming of the motor car, and relates the experiences of his childhood seen from many years later. I hope this layout captures that spirit. More photos Here..........

 

Deyton Heights............. the kinda place you don't go to when the lights go down............ and they do!












Tram Loco rounding the bend from the Wood Yard at East Dunnet
Roast Green Road Depot  2mts X 0.5mts 7mm Scale 0-16.5 and 09 track Gauges.



Roast Green is a small hamlet in the north of Essex on the border with Cambridgeshire. The area is very rural agricultural land and as such, large farms are quite the 'norm' in this part of East Anglia. This layout has been built assuming that the farms have built a narrow gauge railway to move the produce and other things from the fields to the farm and beyond. As the Farmer likes to maintain his own railway 'In House' he has a Depot on the road from Clavering to Roast Green, hence the name 'Roast Green Road Depot. All manner of rolling stock and other farm implements are maintained, manufactured and serviced at this Depot.

Around this Depot is an even smaller internal narrow gauge railway that moves the heavy items around the maintenance depot. The Turntable forms one end of the loop and is used by the locos to run around the trains. Some times other rolling stock is placed on the Turntable when the trains are being formed. All the buildings are scratch built and the rolling stock is a mixture of kit and scratch built. All of it to, either a gauge of 0-16.5 or 09 but all to a scale of 7mm/foot. More photos can be found in the Photo Gallery page.

Hopewell Spring

Hopewell Spring is a really an exercise in what can be achieved when making a 'Train Set', however with realistic landscape modelling. It was made for a special 1940s themed event held at the St. Augustine Church, Springfield, Chelmsford September 2014. It can be used as a  Public operation layout (Pay & Play) or it can be exhibited as it is using two operators. The size is 66inches X 43inches. This size allows 2nd radius curves to be used and can now run most ready to run rolling stock. It is operated by DCC and this again allows a new dimension to be added in the form of DCC Sound Locomotives.

The Picture shows the Goods Yard but it now runs Diesel and Steam locos and rolling stock from the 1950s and 1960s Please see the photos in the Photo Gallery page.





Gwlyb a gwyntog (Cymru) 5 feet X 2 feet at its widest point.

This layout called Gwlyb a gwyntog (Cymru) (Wet & Windy Wales) is a small end of the branch line railway that goes beyond the last station on the line and ends up at this well ‘off the beaten track’ yard.

It is now a 00 DCC controlled shunting puzzle style 'L' shaped layout with a back ground of gloomy dark foreboding skies and scenery of North Wales............. I was offered this layout and have made the points controllable by remote rod control. I have also remade the buildings and scenery to add to the dull gloomy day…..

More pictures can be found here....

For more details and to book this layout for a Model Railway Exhibition, please use the form on the 'Contact Me' page.


For further details of any of these layouts and their availability for Exhibitions and functions please use the form on the Contact Me page.